Tag Archives: book

Recommended Reading

Is it a crime if a boy doesn’t read the Hardy Boys?

Running a book club, always carrying a book, generally being known as a book nerd that can quote the dewey decimal system, I get asked what I’m reading and if I could recommend a book for so and so, or I just finished Book A, could you recommend something. It happens at least a couple times a month. And a lot around the holidays. Figured maybe it was time to write something up so I, while I still love talking books, I could point folks here for later reference. I’ll update, add, re-arrange frequently, so check back once in awhile. Continue Reading

Kindle Publishing: Links, Lies and XML

Shaking the Tree - Kindle Cover

So I finally took the plunge and released the Shaking the Tree into the wild. Spurred on by JA Konrath klaxon call to self-pub and the always welcome sensation of learning something new, I tackled converting my Word manuscript to the Kindle format. Sounds quite simple right? I mean everyone and everybody uses Word, right? Mac or PC. Creative or corporate. Male or female. Facebook or MySpace. Right? Sort of.

While it’s not as easy as they (the ubiquitous they) make it sound, it’s not terribly difficult either. It does not require a ton of coding skills, though being comfortable with HTML syntax is a plus. It does require a big dollop of patience. Sure, you can hack something together that will be semi-readable with little effort, but if you want something with a little polish and panache (in other words something you won’t blush at charging 99 cents for – you can’t give it away anymore on Amazon) it’s going to take a little time and effort. Then a little more. Then some debugging. Then it should work.

Like always, the Internet is a bounty of useful information. To help you sort the wheat from the chaff, here are the tips, tricks, links, sources, documents and programs that helped me the most. Your mileage may vary. Note, this is only for the Kindle. And really only for fiction or manuscripts without a lot of imagery or internal tables etc. Haven’t tackled Smashwords or other e-book formatting issues yet.

Things you will need:

  • A manuscript, or a bunch of words, something to publish, otherwise what’s the point
  • A computer (with internet connection)
  • Mobipocket Creator
  • Kindle Previewer
  • Kindle Reading App (optional, but I noticed some quirks between the previewer and the apps)
  • Kindle itself (optional)
  • A text editor (like notepad or something a bit fancier like Dreamweaver – either one will get the job done. I like the free Notepad++ myself)
  • A KPD account

Ok, the best place to start is at Amazon’s DTP (hmm, seems like they renamed it to KDP recently) KDP Community page. While a bit light on in-depth how-to’s unless you search the forums, the Getting Started Guide is a worthwhile read for the overview and background on the process. A nice way to get your feet wet and ease into the terminology.

Once I ran through the KDP guides, I moved on to April Hamilton’s How to Use Amazon’s DTP guide (a big PDF, be patient). Her PDF (and her excellent indie author site in general) was by far the most in-depth and hands on training guide that I could find (for free at least). It’s chock full of pictures and step by step instructions written very simply and clearly (not easy to do in technical writing). I thought I had found nirvana. A road map to lead me to the Kindle promise land. I mentioned the patience part above, right?

Now, a little background. Over time, my manuscript had mutated into a Createspace template (long story, but I got a free proof copy so the effort was worth it – remember I like learning new things) with a lot of heavy Word formatting. After a lot of experimenting, I blame this more than anything for taking my off the rails that April had so carefully drawn up. Lesson learned, if at all possible turn off the vast majority of Word formatting and use only the most vanilla template.

The dreaded NCX

April’s guide filled in a lot of holes and taught me a lot about what I was up against, but I just could not get the Word generated table of contents and NCX file to play nice. I went looking for more sources. I found romance writer Nadia Lee’s page on kindle formatting. It takes a much more short hand approach, but after reading April’s guide, the learning curve wasn’t steep and best of all, she sidesteps Word’s table of contents and uses HTML formatting and Mobipocket to create one. Using Nadia’s style sheet template and a lot of hands on cleaning up of Word generated HTML (patience, remember), I was able to get a simple HTML version with working table of contents.

So I was 90% of the way there, but of course marathons don’t really start till the last 10 percent. I still had the NCX file to create. Oh, if you dive into Kindle publishing, you will come to dread those three letters. At least I did until I found CJ’s Easy as Pie Kindle tutorials. The NCX file (Navigation control file for XML) is (sort-of) required by KDP. It tells you it’s required, but if you peek in the forums, you don’t need to create one. But I’m a stickler and if I’m charging folks, I might as well do the most I can, right? By the way, the NCX controls the tick marks (and a few other navigation controls) along the bottom of the Kindle. Not strictly necessary, but it’s all about professionalism. With CJ’s tutorial as a guide I was able to hack my way through a working NCX.

The kindle formatting site was also helpful in a glossary sort of way, going back and checking different things. Or seeing the same instructions written a different way. Or just plain debugging and looking for answers. I started here more than anywhere else when I was stuck.

Using Mobipocket to bind it all together and I was done. Maybe this will help any other indie author struggling flailing away with Kindle issues. If so, it was worth the time to write it up. Besides, I’ll probably need it myself when I finish the next one.

You can check out my author site or better yet, buy a copy of Shaking the Tree Kindle edition at Amazon. It’s only 99 cents! Not many things left you can buy for under a buck.